Showing posts tagged politics
(Reblogged from rosinhabela-deactivated20120205)

moneyisnotimportant:

soupsoup:

Cartoon by Joe HellerGreen Bay Press-Gazette (View more cartoons by Heller)

 That’ll show ‘em.

(Reblogged from moneyisnotimportant)
As a result of several long-building, polarizing trends in American politics and culture, we have lost the ability to execute even the basic functions of government, much less solve the most difficult and divisive problems facing the country. … Those who think that they alone have the right answers, those who demonize those who think differently, and those who refuse to listen and take other points of view into account — these leaders, in my view, are a danger to the American people and to the future of our republic.
former Defense Secretary Robert Gates last week in Philadelphia. (via washingtonpoststyle)
(Reblogged from washingtonpoststyle)
(Reblogged from rosinhabela-deactivated20120205)
(Reblogged from kateoplis)
Students who acquire large debts putting themselves through school are unlikely to think about changing society. When you trap people in a system of debt they can’t afford the time to think. Tuition fee increases are a “disciplinary technique,” and, by the time students graduate, they are not only loaded with debt, but have also internalized the “disciplinarian culture.” This makes them efficient components of the consumer economy.
Noam Chomsky (via cultureofresistance)

(Source: tarot-clow)

(Reblogged from rosinhabela-deactivated20120205)

We need to stop making our schools more like prisons and start making our prisons more like schools.

(Source: paxamericana)

(Reblogged from msdinsmoor)

thedailywhat:

Occupy Wall Street News Round Up of the Day: A week after the “occupation” of Wall Street began with a “Day of Rage,” the peaceful demonstration took a turn for the violent as tensions between police and protesters boiled over.

Between 80 and 100 members of the so-called “99 percent” were arrested for impeding traffic; some were charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. According to protest spokesman Patrick Bruner, the police response was “exceedingly violent.”

Bruner’s claim appears to be confirmed in footage from the Financial District and surrounding areas showing mostly unprovoked altercations between NYPD officers and demonstrators.

“I was shocked because it seemed like one person after another was being brutally tackled, and it wasn’t clear why,” rally attendee Meaghan Linick told the New York Daily News. “I was deeply disturbed to see them throw a man [down] and immediately they were pounding on him. Their arms were going back in the air. I couldn’t believe how violent five people needed to be against one unarmed man.”

Perhaps the most egregious incident involving excessive force came after NYPD officers began kettling protesters with orange police nets. In a video posted to YouTube, a uniformed officer can clearly be seen approaching a corralled group of women and macing them without warning or provocation, before quickly leaving the scene (see below).

In a statement to CBS New York, the NYPD said every arrest made was “justified.” The official Occupy Wall Street website is demanding jail time for the police officer responsible for pepper spraying the barricaded women.

Ironically, by attempting to curb the protesters’ continued Wall Street presence, the police may have unwittingly supplied the “diffuse and leaderless convocation of activists against greed, corporate influence, gross social inequality and other nasty byproducts of wayward capitalism” with the “infusion of energy” they had long hoped for.

Further Reading/Viewing: Photos: 1 2, Videos: 1 2 3, Twitter, Facebook, LiveStream.

[ows / nydn / bi / ap via wapo / cbsny / nyt.]

(Source: thedailywhat)

(Reblogged from whisperoftheshot)
(Reblogged from moneyisnotimportant)
(Reblogged from kateoplis)

moneyisnotimportant:

vonzumwalt:

kinda crazy. apple has more cash than the U.S. government.

This really puts things into perspective!

(Reblogged from moneyisnotimportant)
(Reblogged from whisperoftheshot)
The comments, in newspapers and online, which chime with me are the ones professing sadness, confusion and a willingness to wait for more information before jumping to conclusions, the latter being particularly welcome. Some commentators leapt to equal and opposite forms of idiocy. Conservative pundits spoke mechanically of “mindless” violence (it’s never mindless, it just means you don’t consider the mind behind it) while some on the left bent over backwards to justify looting as an anti-consumerist act, failing to discriminate between anti-police violence and nicking trainers from Foot Locker, understandable outrage and plain old criminality, and thus doing rightwing pundits’ job for them. […]

What’s happening now isn’t a protest or, as Darcus Howe put it, an “insurrection” – it’s a nervous breakdown. The motor isn’t a political cause but a mood. Politics is in the background, in the pervasive frustration and anxiety of an alienated underclass: record levels of youth unemployment, widening inequality, social services (especially youth services) slashed to the bone, the Education Maintenance Allowance scrapped, a damaged relationship between the police and the community, and collapsing faith in a seemingly indifferent political class. But the immediate outcome makes the lives of residents – many of whom are every bit as deprived as the rioters – even worse than they were last week and opens the door to an authoritarian response. A riot is a weapon of last resort; a cry for help; a public form of self-harming. It pays for short-term catharsis with long-term pain.
(Reblogged from kateoplis)